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It is having your heart set on fire. Eucharistic adoration is about identifying with the Son, who adores the Father and loves us. Like Jesus, adoration is about giving new and abundant life to all around us.

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It is a passionate need to care deeply about others, about people, about the world we live in, and about the whole of creation. It is wanting to make a difference—ready to be fully committed, as bread that is broken in God's hands for everyone, for always, in the Eucharist.

Adoration is also ministry because to adore Jesus in the Eucharist also means being involved in his cause, following his style of life, and walking in the path of his destiny. It is to nourish in oneself the desire for self-giving. It is to learn to commit one's self and to give one's life for our brothers and sisters. It is learning to love without limits. It is praying for all those we hear about and get to know through television and news headlines and for all those whose suffering is ignored or denied. It is a space where we can allow ourselves to be touched by a greater spirit of solidarity, to become one with all people, as Jesus did.

To adore Jesus in the Eucharist is also a lesson in littleness. To contemplate Jesus is to look upon one who was rich but made himself poor; the all-powerful one who made himself weak; the great God who became a child, a man, a piece of bread. It is to contemplate the one who fills the universe but who emptied himself. It is to look with pure eyes and a clean heart that sees God in poor and vulnerable ones. It is to discover the beauty that is hidden in humility. One leaves eucharistic adoration and takes farewell of Jesus, perhaps a little smaller in one's own eyes.

To adore Jesus in the Eucharist is also a lesson in littleness. To contemplate Jesus is to look upon one who was rich but made himself poor; the all-powerful one who made himself weak; the great God who became a child, a man, a piece of bread. It is to contemplate the one who fills the universe but who emptied himself. It is to look with pure eyes and a clean heart that sees God in poor and vulnerable ones.

It is to discover the beauty that is hidden in humility. One leaves eucharistic adoration and takes farewell of Jesus, perhaps a little smaller in one's own eyes. It is time, too, spent with the whole of humanity, with all that is and all that can be—an appointment that places us at the heart of reality and at the center of history.

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Hidden beneath the surface of eucharistic adoration is a whole new world. Eucharistic adoration cannot be separated from who we are as human beings, created by God and followers of Jesus Christ. It is ours to discover and explore. This text on eucharistic adoration was taken from a reflection by Sister Margaret Scott, acj www. Sister Margaret has held leadership positions in her community, the Handmaids of the Sacred heart of Jesus, and is a regular speaker in various countries.

She is currently the head of Seisen International School in Japan. Eucharistic adoration takes place every day from am until noon in the St. Raphaela Center Chapel.

Take a pause in your busy day and stop in to enjoy a peaceful moment in prayer before Jesus present in the Eucharist. See how it might become a force for change in your life and for the transformation of the world around you! By Decree of the Congregation for the Sacraments and Divine Worship, dated 9 December , Saint Peter Julian Eymard, Priest, was added to the General Roman Calendar with the rank of optional memoria: Font and fullness of all evangelization and striking expression of the infinite love of our divine Redeemer for mankind, the Holy Eucharist clearly marked the life and pastoral activity of Peter Julian Eymard.

He truly deserves to be called an outstanding apostle of the Eucharist. In fact, his mission in the Church consisted in promoting the centrality of the Eucharistic Mystery in the whole life of the Christian community. The practice of prolonged Eucharistic adoration also spread to the United States in the 19th century and Saint John Neumann the Archbishop of Philadelphia started Forty Hours adorations there, where it continues to date.

17 Volume Two Conversations With The Eucharistic Heart Of Jesus

Early Anglicanism officially rejected Eucharistic adoration. Article XXVIII — Of the Lord's Supper in Anglicanism's 39 Articles rejects transubstantiation , declaring that "Transubstantiation or the change of the substance of Bread and Wine in the Supper of the Lord, cannot be proved by Holy Writ; but is repugnant to the plain words of Scripture, overthroweth the nature of a Sacrament, and hath given occasion to many superstitions.

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However, since the midth century, the Oxford Movement has broadened Anglican opinions on the matter. An early 20th century bishop, the Right Reverend Edgar Gibson , Bishop of Gloucester , wrote of Article 28 that "The statement in the Article is worded with the utmost care, and with studied moderation. It cannot be said that any one of the practices is condemned or prohibited by it. It only amounts to this: that none of them can claim to be part of the original Divine institution. Today, opinions on the nature of the Eucharist and thus on the propriety of adoration and exposition of the Blessed Sacrament vary in the Anglican tradition see Anglican Eucharistic theology , but many Anglo-Catholics practice Eucharistic adoration.

Lutheran Eucharistic adoration is most commonly limited in duration to the Eucharistic service because Lutheran tradition typically does not include public reservation of the Sacrament. If the holy elements are not consumed at the altar or after the service, then they can be set aside and placed in an aumbry , which is normally located in the sacristy. Primarily, the extra hosts are reserved for another Eucharist or for taking to the sick and those too feeble to attend a church service. However, in North America and Europe, some Lutherans may choose to reserve the Eucharist in a tabernacle near the altar.

Historically in Lutheranism there have been two parties regarding Eucharistic adoration: Gnesio-Lutherans , who followed Martin Luther's view in favor of adoration, and Philippists who followed Philipp Melanchthon 's view against it. Although Luther did not entirely approve of the Feast of Corpus Christi , [43] he wrote a treatise The Adoration of the Sacrament where he defended adoration but desired that the issue not be forced. In his reform of the Roman Mass Luther placed the Sanctus after the Institution Narrative to serve as a solemn act of worship of the Real Presence just brought about by the latter.

After the death of Martin Luther , further controversies developed including Crypto-Calvinism and the second Sacramentarian controversy, started by Gnesio-Lutheran Joachim Westphal. The Philippist understanding of the Real Presence without overt adoration through time became dominant in Lutheranism, although it is not in accordance with Luther's teaching. The German theologian Andreas Musculus can be regarded as one of the warmest defenders of Eucharistic adoration in early Lutheranism.

Catholic doctrine holds that at the moment of consecration the elements of bread and wine are changed substantially into the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ while the appearances the "species" of the elements remain. In the doctrine of Real Presence , at the point of consecration, the act that takes place is a double miracle: 1 that Christ is present in a physical form and 2 that the bread and wine have truly, substantially become Jesus' Body and Blood. Because Roman Catholics believe that Christ is truly present Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity in the Eucharist, the reserved sacrament serves as a focal point of adoration.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states that: "The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist.

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Faustina Kowalska stated that she was called to religious life while attending the Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament at age seven. Cohen went on to help establish the widespread practice of nocturnal adoration. The practice of a "daily Holy Hour " of adoration has been encouraged in the Catholic tradition. Mother Teresa of Calcutta had a Holy Hour each day and all members of her Missionaries of Charity followed her example.

Draw Near to the Eucharist

Since the Middle Ages the practice of Eucharistic adoration outside Mass has been encouraged by the popes. In the midst of the Second Vatican Council , on 3 September , a few days before opening the fourth session, Pope Paul VI issued the Encyclical Mysterium fidei whereby he urged daily Mass and communion and said, "And they should not forget about paying a visit during the day to the Most Blessed Sacrament in the very special place of honor where it is reserved in churches in keeping with the liturgical laws, since this is a proof of gratitude and a pledge of love and a display of the adoration that is owed to Christ the Lord who is present there.

Pius X used to say: "The daily adoration or visit to the Blessed Sacrament is the practice which is the fountainhead of all devotional works," [ citation needed ]. Jesus waits for us in this sacrament of love. Let us be generous with our time in going to meet Him in adoration and in contemplation that is full of faith. It is the responsibility of Pastors to encourage, also by their personal witness, the practice of Eucharistic adoration, and exposition of the Blessed Sacrament.

One of the better known prayers of reparation to the Blessed Sacrament is attributed to the Angel of Portugal, said to have appeared at Fatima:. Eucharistic celebrations of any nature are sometimes initiated with the first four or at least the first stanza of the hymn Pange lingua , and often concluded with the Tantum ergo being the other two stanzas of the same hymn , or at the least the versicle and oration attached to the Tantum ergo see the article.

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Thomas Aquinas. Apart from promoting the Eucharist, Saint Peter Juliian Eymard also made meditations before the Blessed host and his writings were later published as a book: The Real Presence. During her life, the poem was sent to various religious communities and was included in a notebook of her poems. Significant portions of the writings of the Venerable Concepcion Cabrera de Armida were reported as having been based on her meditations during adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. In her book Eucharist: true jewel of eucharistic spirituality Maria Candida of the Eucharist who was beatified by Pope John Paul II wrote about her own personal experiences and reflections on Eucharistic meditation.

Perpetual adoration is the practice of the continuous exposition and adoration of the Eucharist, twenty-four hours a day.


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Similar to the "Perpetual Rosary" in which the Rosary is recited uninterrupted by a changing group of people, this practice gained popularity among Roman Catholics in 19th-century France and has since spread to lay Catholics in parishes across the world. During perpetual adoration, a specific person performs adoration for a period of one hour or more, so there is always at least one person who performs adoration during each day and night. However, during Mass the Blessed Sacrament should be reposed and is then exposed again after Mass.

Perpetual adoration of God by psalm and prayer has been a tradition among Christians since ancient times, e. The first recorded instance of perpetual adoration formally began in Avignon , France , on 11 September With the permission of Pope Honorius III , the idea was ratified and the adoration continued there practically uninterrupted until the chaos of the French Revolution halted it from A small house was bought on Rue Feron in Paris and a Benedictine convent, founded for this purpose, began perpetual adoration there on 25 March , one or more nuns kneeling in front of the altar in adoration each hour of the day and night.

The simple Benedictine rules with which the nuns started were amended and formal approval for perpetual adoration was provided by the Camera Apostolica in Rome in Various Roman Catholic societies and orders were formed for the specific purpose of perpetual adoration prior to the 19th century, e. By the beginning of the 19th century, in France as well as elsewhere in Europe, strong currents in favor of Eucharistic piety, devotions and adoration began to appear. The 19th century thus witnessed a rapid growth in perpetual adoration societies, and some existing orders e.

A number of perpetual adoration orders were also formed in the United States , e. The Poor Clares of the Monastery of Saint Mary of the Angels of Perpetual Adoration, in Drumshanbo , Ireland, first established perpetual adoration on 25 March , and have continued the practice uninterrupted to this day. In the 20th century, the practice of perpetual adoration spread from monasteries and convents to Catholic parishes at large, and is now also performed by lay Catholics.

The perpetual adoration chapel in Saint Peter's Basilica was inaugurated by Pope John Paul II in and a number of the major basilicas in Rome have also started perpetual adoration in the 20th century. Early in the 20th century, questions arose as to the suitability of perpetual adoration by lay Catholics.

However, after various discussions, on 2 June feast of Corpus Christi , the Pontifical Council for the Laity issued specific guidelines that permit perpetual adoration in parishes. In order to establish a "perpetual adoration chapel" in a parish, the local priest must obtain permission from his bishop by submitting a request along with the required information for the local "perpetual adoration association", its officers, etc.